Ad Spot

Troy continues vaccinations

Troy University is doing its part to combat COVID-19 by continuing to provide vaccinations to eligible individuals.

The COVID-19 vaccine clinic, set up at the University’s Student Health Center, has already administered about 1,700 doses, according to Herb Reeves, Dean of Student Services. On Thursday, Troy University began administering the second round of the Moderna vaccine at 8 a.m. It will continue administering first doses as well.

“We had faculty and staff who were in the categories to be vaccinated but had nowhere to go to get vaccinated early on,” Reeves said. “We applied to be a vaccination site, were approved and got our vaccine. Troy always tries to be a good community partner, and this was an opportunity to serve our faculty and staff but also to be a partner to the community and assist in getting these vaccines to as many people as possible.”

Troy nursing students and faculty members have volunteered to administer and manage the vaccine clinic.

“I’m excited to help the community,” said Dr. Elizabeth Wyckoff, Assistant Professor in Troy’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program. “It’s something I believe in, and it’s an honor to be able to help everyone out during this tough time that we’re in. That’s why we become a nurse — we want to help out and be right in the thick of it when we need to be. At Troy, they give us this opportunity. We don’t just sit in the office and teach in the classroom, we get to help the community and be involved.”

Wyckoff said she’s been surprised by the wide range of people who she’s helped at the clinic.

“We’ve had people come from all over the state, different parts of the state where I never would’ve thought people would drive from to get the vaccine,” she said. “It’s really making an impact. It’s really exciting that we’re having an impact not just here in Troy but statewide.”

While many are being vaccinated, Reeves said it’s important for the Troy community to continue adhering to the Troy Strong COVID-19 safety guidelines, including wearing face coverings.

“I don’t think we can just start vaccinating people and declare victory,” he said. “I think it’s getting much better, but we could still have an outbreak. Millions of people have not been vaccinated. We’re thankful for what we’ve been able to do this year with our students. Getting across that finish line is going to mean, at least for rest of this semester of classes, we finish out with everyone complying with our COVID-19 protocols.”